What requirements should your products meet? What are your obligations in Europe, North America and the Middle East? What solutions should be adopted? As the leading international expert in lift safety and quality, Liftinstituut – as a NoBo and an AECO – is your guide through the maze of technical issues, safeguards, codes and standards.

The modern cars and planes can’t do without it anymore: electronics and software. In a relatively small time a lot of control and safety systems became software based. Lifts and escalators are following rapidly. Lifts and safety are inseparably connected to each other in the history of the lift technology. National and international standards have long been an adequate level of prescribed safety, on the basis of the specific state of the art. Since the introduction of the European Lifts Directive it is possible to deviate from those standards, as long as an equivalent level of safety is demonstrated. This is where Programmable Electronic Safety Systems became possible for the first time.

 

The new Lift Directive was published on 29 March 2014. This new Lift Directive became effective in every European Member State on 20 April 2016. The existing Lift Directive 95/16/EC was repealed at that time.

 

The new standards EN 81-20 and EN 81-50 have been harmonised under Directive 95/16/EC for Lifts since November 14, 2014. By harmonising these standards, application of them gives the presumption of conformity with the Lifts Directive.

 

In 2011, the report ‘Evacuating high-rise buildings by elevators and stairs’ was published in the Netherlands. It was the result of extensive research into the circumstances and options surrounding evacuation of high-rise buildings in the Netherlands where use of elevators plays a major a role. Liftinstituut was involved in the research. The report’s most important conclusion was that elevators are always essential in these situations.

 

Liftinstituut has enormous experience in EU safety regulations like:

 

  • Lift Directive: National legislation of EU member states relating to lift safety has been replaced by the European Lift Directive.
  • Machinery Directive: On 29 December 2009, the new Machinery Directive 2006/42/EC came into force. This directive replaces the old Machinery Directive 98/37/EC.
  • Lift standards: Liftinstituut helps clarify the various European standards EN81-1, EN81-2, EN 81-28,EN81-72 and more

National legislation of EU member states relating to lift safety has been replaced by the European Lift Directive. This directive has two important objectives:

 

  • To remove trade barriers: lifts and safety components produced in line with the directive may be traded freely throughout the EU.
  • To improve safety: the directive sets stringent requirements when it comes to safeguarding health and safety.

 

On 29 December 2009, the new Machinery Directive 2006/42/EC came into force. This directive replaces the old Machinery Directive 98/37/EC. There is no transition period. The directive can also be important for lift manufacturers. The Lift Directive is distinct from the Machinery Directive and lifts must meet both directives.

 

There are a number of European standards detailing safety rules for various types of lift. They cover different aspects of lift construction and operation. The most important standards are summarized below. Liftinstituut will be happy to supply you with further information.

 

All information about 'Application for Certifcation', 'Contents of Code Compliance Documentation' (CCD), 'Contents of Code Data Plate' (if certified), 'Evaluation', 'Contents of Liftinstituut Certificate of Conformance'. 'Fulfilling the requirements of the code A17.1/B44', 'Global Essential Safety Requirements' (GESRs). Risk Assessment Proces, 'Protective measures and safety principles', 'Safety Parameters' (SPs) and other inportant issues related to product certification with Liftinstituut.

 

 

Download the flowchart as pdf-file

 

Driven by the sustainability objectives, wind turbines are being placed across the whole of Europe. They are often equipped with a lift as standard.

 

These days, wind turbines of a height exceeding 60 metres are often provided with a lift as standard, in combination with a ladder though, in case the lift is out of action and for emergencies. The ladder is often provided with a climbing aid.